Color Exercises

Color Exercise #3: Color Value and Temperature

In this exercise I experimented with mixing pigments to create value scales that progress from light to dark as well as cool to warm and warm to cool.

I refered to the value scale I created using my personal palette pigments in Exercise 1.

When mixing my lights, I made sure to use only pigments that fall between 0% and 15% on my value scale at full strength. I use scrap paper to check the value of the mixtures.

When mixing my mid-value colors I made sure to use only pigments that fall between 25% and 50% on my value scale at full strength.

When mixing my dark value colors I made sure to use only pigments that fall between 70% and 100% on the value scale at full strength.

When using watercolors the value generally lightens a fair amount when dry.

I created a variety of value scales, creating a value scale that begins with a cool, light value color and as the value becomes darker it transitioned to a warm, dark value color.  I also did the reverse, beginning with a warm, light value color and transitioning to a cool, dark value color.

Generally when the light source is warm, the shadows will be cool.  When the light source is cool, the shadows will be warm.  I painted a simple tree and noted the difference between a tree that is painted in all cool or all warm colors compared to a tree painted in both warm and cool colors.  A great illusion of form can be created keeping in mind a simple value/temperature scale.

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