Continuing with example of painting by color value rather than color hue …

Still Life No.3 shown in grayscale mode

After trying a few color value paintings, you might notice that paintings created by color value often fall into standard color schemes.

Still Life No. 3 in full color

Though it may appear that painting by color value is too limited, I find the possibilities to be infinite and feel more playful and inventive with each new painting.

Color Value Still Life No.3 – ink vial and paint brushes: Drawn first with dip pen using Scribal Work Shop “Siren” ink, followed by watercolor washes choosing my colors by color value rather than hue.  Example for Color Value Workshops.

Limited palette: Three tubes of watercolor paint – Aureolin, French Ultramarine Blue and Permanent Alizarin …. all Winsor Newton pigments.

Tom’s bow ties are too hysterical for me to stop at only one painting.  This second study is an example of painting by color value.  I’ll be teaching a Color Value Workshop in Santa Rosa, CA at the end of January and another at the Center for Contemporary Art in Bedminster, NJ in the spring.  One may also be scheduled in Salisbury, MD in the next few months.

Comparing the grayscale values

The image on the right shows the painting before adding another wash of violet to darken the shadows.

Grayscale mode of photograph

For variety, I lightened the value of the tie on the right.  Notice that the shadows are much darker than the bow ties.  When I mixed the violet for the shadows, I used too much water and the result was a wash that dried much too light.  I painted the rest of the painting before adjusting thew shadow value.  Had I painted using oil paints, the value of the mixed violet would not have lightened unless I added white.  The Color Value Workshop may be presented in either watercolor or oil.

Comparison in full color

Getting the values right is more important than getting the colors (hues) right!

Sketchbook drawings, color value studies: Family Treasures No. 46, Tom’s Bow Ties.  Drawn first with Sheaffer, snorkel, white dot fountain pen filled with Noodler’s Heart of Darkness Ink, followed by watercolor washes.